In 1858 a new tower was built on the north side of the bay entrance, and was lit on January 1, 1859. A site was selected one-half mile west of the original lighthouse, and work on the tower was supervised by John Newton of the Army Corps of Engineers. Trees on Santa Rosa Island were said to block the light, and the light was considered too dim. It slowly rotates, even during the day, so I had to be fast taking a multiple exposure HDR sequence. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet (46 m) tall, and also sits on a 40-foot (12 m) bluff located on the Pensacola Naval Air Station, placing the light 190 feet (58 m) above sea level. Nature took another swipe at the lighthouse on August 31, 1886, when a rare earthquake shook the tower. Confederate authorities removed the lens from the lighthouse, and most of the lighthouse supplies were requisitioned for the war effort. But during our last visit to Florida, my family visited the Pensacola Lighthouse that sits on the  Pensacola aval Air Station (NAS). The first Pensacola Light was the lightship Aurora Borealis. There has been a lighthouse in that area since 1823. Mills (1870), John Robinson (1870 – 1872), Stephen Kennedy (1872 – 1873), Hugh Kennedy (1873 – 1875), Frank Peterson (1875 – 1876), Henry Johnson (1877), John Burns (1877 – 1878), John McNair (1878), George P. Crause (1878 – 1879), Alvin Alexander (1879), Elisha V. Glover (1879), Aaron Wingate (1879 – 1880), Martha C. Lawrence (1880 – 1885), Albert M. Palmes (1885 – 1886), Adrian Whiting (1886 – 1888), William G. Clifford (1888 – 1889), John M. Quarrier (1889 – 1892), Charles L. Morrison (1892), William P. Carroll (1892 – 1896), Alfred A. Berghell (1896 – 1897), Arthur C.E. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet tall, and sits on a 40-foot bluff located on the NAS, placing the light 190 feet above sea level. Mills (1870 – 1871), Stephen Jarvis (1871 – 1872), John Robinson (1872 – 1873), Charles J. Mabery (1873 – 1874), Richard Morris (1874 – 1875), Richard Riggs (1875 – 1877), Samuel C. Lawrence (1877 – 1885), William A. Bethel (1885 – 1886), George T. Clifford (1886 – 1917), William B. Thompson (1917 – 1929), William J. Doyle (1929 – 1931), George W. Darby (1931 – 1938), Louis Buras (1938 – 1942), James M. Hatten (1942 – 1953). In 1863 the Pensacola Light was relit using a fourth-order Fresnel lens. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard, but the Pensacola Lighthouse Association maintains the dwelling and tower. This light, known as the Pensacola Bar Beacon, was a square pyramidal wooden tower, 26 feet (7.9 m) tall, sitting on a point 29 feet (8.8 m) above sea level, so that the light was 55 feet (17 m) above the water. In 1863 the Pensacola Light was relit using a fourth-order Fresnel lens. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet (46 m) tall, and also sits on a 40-foot (12 m) bluff located on the Pensacola Naval Air Station, placing the light 190 feet (58 m) above sea level. “Pensacola Lighthouse,” Tom Garner, The Keeper’s Log, Fall 1999. In 1852, the newly established Lighthouse Board recommended that a “first-class seacoast light” with a height no less than 150 feet be built at Pensacola. Confederate forces later evacuated Pensacola, and were replaced by Union forces. The Lighthouse and Museum offer a mixture of learning, sightseeing, and (let’s be honest) exercise! In 1879 a new front range beacon was erected 448 feet (137 m) southeast of the light tower. The new, and current, tower is 150 feet tall, and also sits on a 40 foot bluff located on Naval Air Station Pensacola, placing the light 190 feet above sea level. This is the year that a lighthouse was first reported in the vicinity or at that location. It was lit again in December 1862. [1], In 1989, the lighthouse and keeper's quarters were listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press. Tower tours were discontinued in 2007 by the Coast Guard over liability and safety concerns, but the Pensacola Lighthouse Association worked out a way to reinstate tours starting in June 2008. “It is about 9- to 10-feet tall and 6-feet wide and looks like crystal prisms. Built in 1859, the Lighthouse is located onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. The lighthouse is located on the grounds of Naval Air Station Pensacola, home to the Blue Angels. The Pensacola Bar Beacon was removed from service and demolished some time in the early 1900s. The tower’s lightning rod was found to be defective, as the surge of electricity melted fixtures in the call-bell and broke several large holes in the brick masonry of the covered way linking the tower to the keeper’s dwelling.