by Charles Johnston, Volume 1. War Office. General Staff Published 1907.p.56, Official History of the Operations in Somaliland, Volume 1. p. 41. Sie machen grob ein Fünftel der Bevölkerung Somalias aus und leben im Norden Somalias (Somaliland) sowie im Gebiet Haud in der angrenzenden äthiopischen Somali-Region. [22], The Marrehan and the Habr Magadle [Magādi] also play a very prominent role (...) The text refers to two Ahmads's with the nickname 'Left-handed'. “It has now become the doctrine of a large clan of politicians that political honesty is unnecessary, slow, subversive of a man’s interests, and incompatible with quick onward movement.”—Anthony Trollope (1815–1882). One tradition maintains that Isaaq had twin sons: Ahmed or Arap, and Ismail or Gerhajis. According to that tree, Habar Yoonis is a sub-sub-sub clan of Isaaq whereas Habar Awal is a sub clan of Isaaq. [33][34][35] [25] The Habr Magādle clan were highly appreciated and praised by the leader Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi for their bravery and loyalty. Indeed, most of the largest clans of the clan-family are in fact uterine alliances hence the matronymic "Habr" which in archaic Somalimeans "mother"… Womöglich waren sie einst ein Teilclan der Dir, der sich mit wachsender zahlenmäßiger Bedeutung als separate Clanfamilie zu betrachten begann und eine eigenständige arabische Abstammung beanspruchte.[8]. Bekannte Isaaq sind u. a. Mohammed Haji Ibrahim Egal (Premierminister Somalias 1960 und 1967–1969 und Präsident Somalilands 1993–2004) und Umar Arteh Ghalib (Außenminister Somalias 1969–1977 und Premierminister 1991). The Isaaq have a very wide and densely populated traditional territory. [13] The Isaaq also have a large presence in the western and northern parts of Sool region as well,[14] with Habr Je'lo sub-clan of Isaaq living in the Aynabo district whilst the Habr Yunis subclan of Garhajis lives in the eastern part of Xudun district and the very western part of Las Anod district. Sheikh Ishaaq bin Ahmed al-Raduwi was one of the Arabian scholars that crossed the sea from Arabia to the Horn of Africa to spread Islam around 12th to 13th century. [9] Besides historical sources, one of the more recent printed biographies of Sheikh Ishaaq is the Amjaad of Sheikh Husseen bin Ahmed Darwiish al-Isaaqi as-Soomaali, which was printed in Aden in 1955.[10]. [4], Scheich Isaaq wird von den Isaaq als Heiliger verehrt. [41][42], One tradition maintains that Isaaq had twin sons: Ahmed or Arap, and Ismail or Gerhajis. Int J Afr Hist Stud 19 (4), 679–691. [2][3] He settled in the coastal town ofMaydh in modern-day northernwestern Somalia, where he married into the local Dirclan. In the Isaaq clan-family, component clans are divided into two uterine divisions, as shown in the genealogy. In the Isaaq clan-family, component clans are divided into two uterine divisions as shown in genealogy. The Somalis in general have a great inclination to poetry; a particular passion for the stories, the stories and songs of love. Sie machen grob ein Fünftel der Bevölkerung Somalias aus und leben im Norden Somalias (Somaliland) sowie im Gebiet Haud in der angrenzenden äthiopischen Somali-Region. Other articles where Isaaq is discussed: Djibouti: Ethnic groups: …members of the Gadaboursi and Isaaq clans that migrated from northern Somalia during the 20th century to work on the construction of the Djibouti–Addis Ababa railway and Djibouti city’s port expansion. Nach dem Sturz Barres waren die Isaaq 1991 federführend bei der Unabhängigkeitserklärung Nordsomalias als Somaliland. 1899. One is regularly presented as 'Ahmad Guray, the Somali' (...) identified as Ahmad Guray Xuseyn, chief of the Habr Magadle. Hence the Shiekh belonged to the Ashraf or Sada (titles given the descendents of the prophet). 1. [9] Sheikh Ishaaq's mawlid (birthday) is also celebrated every Thursday with a public reading of his manaaqib (a collection of glorious deeds). Jahrhunderts größtenteils als Britisch-Somaliland kolonialisiert. African Studies Center, Northeast African studies, Volumes 11–12, (Michigan State University Press: 1989), p.32. The Visit of Frederick Forbes to the Somali Coast in 1833 R Bridges. [8] His Siyaara or pilgrimage is performed annually both within Somaliland and in the diaspora particularly in the Middle East among Isaaq expatriates. The Journal of The anthropological institute of Great Britain and Ireland| Vol.21 p. 161, Journal of the East Africa Natural History Society: Official Publication of the Coryndon Memorial Museum Vol.17 p. 76. The first division is between those lineages descended from sons of Sheikh Ishaaq by a Harari woman – the Habr Habuusheed – and those descended from sons of Sheikh Ishaaq by a Somali woman of the Magaadle sub-clan of the Dir – the Habr Magaadle. [6] Zu den Habar Magaadle gehören die Garhajis (mit den Eidagalla und Habar Yunis als wichtigsten Unterclans), die Habar Awal und die kleineren Clans der Ayuub und Arab.