"[7], Colbert married his childhood sweetheart, Lorna Elizabeth Tuck, on August 26, 1944. In 1953, at the age of 32, he left Yale to become the dean of the St. Louis University School of Medicine, making him the youngest dean of a medical school at the time. He is the father of Stephen Colbert and Elizabeth Colbert Busch. During his five years of service, Dr. Colbert oversaw the Medical University during a period of unparalleled growth. James W. Colbert was born, along with twin sister Margaret, on December 14, 1920 in the Bronx, New York to parents James Sr. and Mary Tormey Colbert. James William Colbert Jr. (December 15, 1920 – September 11, 1974) was an American physician and the first vice president of academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), serving in this capacity from 1969 until his death in a plane crash in 1974. Dr. Colbert was particularly noted for his pivotal role in negotiating a peaceful resolution to the volatile and racially-divisive 1969 Hospital Workers Strike. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Colbert Busch is the eighth of eleven children of parents James William Colbert Jr., who served as the first Vice President of Academic Affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina, and Lorna (née Tuck) Colbert, who was a homemaker.. In 1949, Dr. Colbert returned to the Army Medical Corps, where he served as a representative of the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board, Director of Hepatitis Research Team, and Technical Director of the Hepatitis Laboratory in Munich, Germany. Early life and education. Husband of Lorna Elizabeth Colbert Surviving are a son, Dr. James W. Colbert Jr… James married Lorna, Elizabeth Colbert. The family lived in Larchmont, Westchester County, New York and was strictly Roman Catholic. The three were buried together at the Annapolis National Cemetery in Maryland. He was also the father of 11 children, including performer Stephen Colbert and noted intellectual property attorney Edward T. Colbert. [10][11], Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign, "Legacy, With Integrity and Dignity: The Life of James W. Colbert, Jr., M.D. In 1960, he had met with future president John F. Kennedy. Geni requires JavaScript! Via Wikimedia Commons at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stephen_Colbert_December_2017.jpg#mw-jump-to-license, Medical University of South Carolina Library, "Jim Colbert", "James W. Colbert", "Capt. James, William Colbert was born on month day 1920, at birth place, New York, to James, William Colbert and Mary, M Tormey. Also after 1949, he joined the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine, where he was promoted to assistant dean in 1951. He lived at 14 North Chatsworth Avenue. Son of James William Colbert and Mary M Colbert Early life and education. ", "Desk from "The Colbert Report" auctioned on behalf of MUSC", "James W. Colbert, Jr., M.D. Colbert, known as "Jim" to his family, was considered a "bookish" child. James William Colbert Jr. (December 15, 1920 – September 11, 1974) was an American physician and the first vice president of academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), serving in this capacity from 1969 until his death in a plane crash in 1974. Colbert, spending a year in Europe with the U.S. Army Medical Corps. [4] In 1969, he and his family moved from Washington, D.C., where he had been working for the National Institutes of Health, to South Carolina. [5] He became the first vice president for academic affairs at the Medical University of South Carolina on February 1, 1969, and remained in that position until his death. On February 1, 1969, Dr. Colbert arrived at the Medical University of South Carolina as its first Vice President for Academic Affairs. Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. was a renowned medical doctor and a captain in the United States Army. Together, the couple had 11 children: This section incorporates text from the Medical University of South Carolina Library, a public institution. He remained at St. Louis University until 1961, when he became associate director for extramural programs at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health.