Even though they appeared in several films together, there was little love lost between Lon Chaney Jr and Evelyn Ankers. He No appeared in support of Bob Hope in “My Favorite Brunette,” with Jerry Lewis in “Pardners” and with Gary Cooper in “High Noon.” The last named, a 1952 film in which he portrayed an arthritic old marshal, won Mr. Cooper an Academy Award. He appeared in an episode of the western series Tombstone Territory titled "The Black Marshal from Deadwood" (1958), and appeared in numerous western series such as Rawhide. (1951), Flame of Araby (1952), The Bushwackers (1952), Thief of Damascus (1952), Battles of Chief Pontiac (1952) (in the title role), High Noon (1952), Springfield Rifle (1952), The Black Castle (1952) (a return to horror), Raiders of the Seven Seas (1953), A Lion Is in the Streets (1953), The Boy from Oklahoma (1954), Casanova's Big Night (1954), Passion (1954), The Black Pirates (1954), Jivaro (1955), Big House, U.S.A. (1955), I Died a Thousand Times (1955), The Indian Fighter (1955), and The Black Sleep (1956). His first wife Dorothy divorced him in 1936 for drinking too much and being "sullen". He played number of supporting parts before a producer in 1935 insisted on changing his name to Lon Chaney Jr. as a marketing ploy. Always, however, there was the desire to follow in his father's footsteps. He had a leading role in Indestructible Man (1956) then was back to support parts: Manfish (1956); a Martin and Lewis comedy, Pardners (1956); Daniel Boone, Trail Blazer (1957); The Cyclops (1957) and The Alligator People (1959). In 1962, Chaney gained a chance to briefly play Quasimodo in a simulacrum of his father's make-up, as well as return to his roles of the Mummy and the Wolf Man on the television series Route 66 with friends Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre. This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. From an early age, he worked hard to avoid his famous father's shadow. He made a second mummy movie, The Mummy's Ghost (1944) and had a support part in Cobra Woman (1944), starring Maria Montez and Ghost Catcher (1944), with Olsen and Johnson. He had a small role in an Abbott and Costello comedy Here Come the Co-Eds (1945), then made more Inner Sanctums: The Frozen Ghost (1945) and Strange Confession (1945). He later made Charlie Chan in City in Darkness (1939) and Frontier Marshal (1939). Mr. Chaney first appeared in stock companies in the Middle West and then began playing small roles in the movies as Creighton Chaney. Chaney Jr's only stage appearance had been as Lennie Small in a production of Of Mice and Men with Wallace Ford. Chaney was the main villain in a Tom Tyler B Western, Cheyenne Rides Again (1937) and was in a serial, Secret Agent X-9 (1937). He was the only person to have played all four of the classic movie monsters: Pictured on one of a set of five 32¢ US commemorative postage stamps, issued 30 September 1997, celebrating "Famous Movie Monsters". His bread-and-butter work during this decade was television – where he made guest appearances on everything from Wagon Train to The Monkees – and in a string of supporting roles in low-budget Westerns produced by A. C. Lyles for Paramount. Universal released their film biography of his father, Man of a Thousand Faces (1957), featuring a semi-fictionalized version of Creighton's life story from his birth up until his father's death. Universal got him to play a henchman in their serial, Ace Drummond (1937) and he was uncredited in Columbia's Killer at Large (1937). Applications of Make-Up Through the 1940s–1960s, Additional Information on Chaney's Career, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lon_Chaney_Jr.&oldid=986128950, Articles with dead external links from July 2020, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from March 2018, All articles needing additional references, Articles lacking reliable references from April 2019, Articles with unsourced statements from April 2019, Wikipedia articles with BIBSYS identifiers, Wikipedia articles with CANTIC identifiers, Wikipedia articles with SNAC-ID identifiers, Wikipedia articles with SUDOC identifiers, Wikipedia articles with Trove identifiers, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 October 2020, at 23:45. They had two sons: Lon Ralph Chaney and Ronald Creighton Chaney. His father took him outside to an ice-covered lake, broke the ice and put him into the ice-cold water to jump-start his breathing. He is shown as the title character in. [16], Chaney died of heart failure at age 67 on July 12, 1973 in San Clemente, California. In the 1960s, Chaney specialised in horror films, such as House of Terror (1960), The Devil's Messenger (1961) and The Haunted Palace (1963), replacing Boris Karloff in the last of those for Roger Corman. The process took some 24 hours for the few minutes on the screen in which the dying wolfman became an ordinary citizen. Young Creighton lived in various homes and boarding schools until 1916, when his father (now employed in the film industry) married Hazel Hastings and could provide a stable home. Creighton's life changed forever when his father was diagnosed with throat cancer and died on August 26, 1930, at the age of 47. He was posthumously awarded a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs Walk of Stars in Palm Springs, California on January 11, 1999. of Frankenstein on the anthology series Tales of Tomorrow for which he allegedly showed up drunk, though that contention is unsubstantiated. He had two sons by his first wife, Lon Ralph Chaney (born July 3, 1928) and Ronald Creighton Chaney (born March 18, 1930), both now deceased. Was possibly not as tall as is often reported. Ron Chaney, a 38-year-old California contractor who bears little resemblance to his Wolf Man grandfather, is more inspired than ever to finish a book begun by Lon Chaney Jr. about the family. Creighton Tull Chaney (February 10, 1906 – July 12, 1973), known by his stage name Lon Chaney Jr., was an American actor known for playing Larry Talbot in the film The Wolf Man (1941) and its various crossovers, Count Alucard (Dracula spelled backward), Frankenstein's monster in The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942), the Mummy in three pictures, and various other roles in many Universal horror films. Chaney established himself as a favorite of producer Stanley Kramer; in addition to playing a key supporting role in High Noon (1952) (starring Gary Cooper), he also appeared in Not as a Stranger (1955)—a hospital melodrama featuring Robert Mitchum and Frank Sinatra—and The Defiant Ones (1958, starring Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier). Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions. SAN CLEMENTE, Calif., July 13 (AP)—Lon Chaney Jr., the film actor, died yesterday at the age of 67. Universal Pictures offered Chaney Jr the lead in Man-Made Monster (1941), a science-fiction horror thriller originally written with Boris Karloff in mind.