Thus, if you realize that you are overall treated better by your boss than your colleagues, it is most probably because you are their favourite! Zoom Etiquette : 20 video call tips to help you put your best face forward! This is considered to be a good sign that your boss is truly putting their interest in your long term success. This is because they want you to test you. "This is where you may begin to feel guilt — when your influence strays outside business acumen," says Taylor. "Your office is not a popularity contest — and when it is, your days of glory can be fleeting.". Liking you as an employee is not as important as helping the team, your engagement in important conversations etc. Your boss knows that you can accept the tasks in the workplace and so often tests you. Thus, if you realize that you are overall treated better by your boss than your colleagues, it is most probably because you are their favourite! Plus, she says, the more you're singled out and given special treatment, the more risk associated with securing the cooperation you need from your team. In such a case you should rather ask for a feedback from new boss. When you're elected the boss' "fave" you often feel like you're on a roll and can't lose. She says there's often a fine line between bosses who appreciate an employee's good work and want to empower the person with more projects, and bosses who favor that employee to the detriment of others. Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert said: "It's often helpful to get to the truth through emails if one-on-one discussions are getting you nowhere. In these difficult times, we should commit to and build an open, responsive and compassionate workplace for all. How to network during the COVID-19 pandemic? Account active Unlike other employees, you may find that your schedule has less scrutiny or your work is not as micromanaged; you can speak up more without as much criticism, and so on, says Taylor. This behaviour of extreme favouritism can also lead to a point where it becomes problematic for both the employees and their team because of unnecessary hostile situations. This is because he knows you will strive for the best. Unlike other employees, you may find that your schedule has less scrutiny, or your work is not as micromanaged; you can speak up more without as much criticism, and so on, says Taylor. “Your boss values your insight and sees your contributions as exceeding your job function.”. This is a key sign, as it shows they respect your judgment and wisdom, and they recognize that you have positive contributions to make, says Kerr. This can be evident either in the form of subtle signs or, now and then, in quite distinct ways by a few employers. If your boss takes the time to share family details and personal information with you more so than with other employees, there's a good chance it's because you're their favorite, says Kerr. Some bosses expect you to be at their beck and call 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They ask your input more than they ask for anyone else's, "Asking for input is a surefire sign that your boss respects your ideas, judgment, and wisdom," says Kerr. "If you're the 'teacher's pet,' you'll have the coveted role of inner-circle adviser on matters that typically go beyond your scope," adds Taylor. "If bosses are brazen in practicing favoritism, they can seriously hurt team morale and increase turnover — not to mention cause legal trouble by creating a hostile work environment," Taylor says. Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behaviour and Thrive in Your Job,” agrees. “If you’re the ‘teacher’s pet,’ you’ll have the coveted role of inner-circle adviser on matters that typically go beyond your scope,” says Taylor. While you may believe you’re not the favorite [team member], that doesn’t necessarily make you the least favorite either.