Avery agrees. Sam goes away to his brother’s wedding for a weekend, and Rose and Avery have a malfunctional fling. Rose is a 24-year old sloppy, vocal-fry narcissist running the old 35-mm film projector up in the booth. Rose leans back in her seat, almost relaxed now, and props her feet up on the seat in front of her). When we when we take the tickets, we just kind of you know when you tear them in half and put the other half in the bin well Well sometimes we take like, uh, like ten percent of those stubs and we, uh, we, uh, we, uh, resell them. (Avery removes his face from his hands and looks at Rose. We’d love to see it! (skip forward through Avery having a monologue about wanting to kill himself…), But it IS an incredible acting opportunity, just because the style is specific, so I decided to give it a shot. Sam is quietly in love with Rose, Avery is quietly depressed, and Rose is oblivious to both of them outside of their intersection with her life. BUT, I am going to do something super current. (his elbows go onto his knees and his face goes into his hands again), (she moves across the room and sits next to him again). Can we just forget that this ever happened, okay? Annie Baker has a very specific style, which (I’m making this up but) I can only describe as Exacerbated Realism: as audience members, we spend a lot of the time watching these characters be human and do pointedly un-dramatic things - like spot-sweep popcorn off the floor of a movie theatre - in silence. What do you think about when you, like, fantasize? Avery stops by later to pick up the replaced film projector that Sam has saved for him, and tells Sam that what he discovered while working there is that he shouldn’t expect everything to turn out well in the end, anyway. When like - my mind goes blank and I like…. All Play Text Property of Publishers. Last week I went and saw a play at The Barrow Street Theatre, and I fell in love with it. I always just think: I’d rather be watching a movie. This one more than most I really recommend you watch the recording I have of it, to get a sense of the pacing. ROSE: And then it like totally goes away and I turn into a like this like dead fish. Sam returns, senses something is different, and feels betrayed. The Cripple of Inishmaan- Martin McDonagh. AVERY: I really don’t want to answer these questions. ROSE: At first I’m like this crazy nymphomaniac. Powered by. [weird quippy one-liner about my opening]. It’s a new play, and it won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2014, and the playwright is currently a Playwright in Residence at Signature Theatre, which is kind of a big deal. And then we take ten percent of the, uh, the, uh Cash for the night. The play is about three people who work in a movie theatre in Massachusettes, one of those old, tacky-colored, one-screen deals that’s kind of faded out with the advent of multiplex movie theatre monopolies like Regal and AMC and Cinemark and the necessity for 3D technology. At the outset of the play he’s training Avery, a college-on-hold student with an almost fanatic knowledge and love of movies. Sam and Rose explain to a reluctant Avery the concept of “dinner money” which is essentially money they steal from the oblivious owner of the theatre and divide equally amongst themselves as complicit employees. Like everyone else is totally blurry except for me. ROSE: Well are we just going to sit here and like freak out together in silence? They refuse, and he recites Ezekiel 25:17 from. I’m not doing a spooky/Halloween themed  play this week or anything like that, unfortunately. (in his opinion the last great American movie ever made) before leaving. In the next scene, we see a new employee, Skylar, who’s replacing Avery from a multiplex nearby. Anyway. At the very least, check out Annie Baker and her plays, others of which include. And as always, buy/read the play before you do the monologue and post what you come up with here! ROSE: When I like fantasize I just like think about. (his face is still in his hands. She ran upstairs, turned the movie off, and is now sitting on the other side of the theatre, confronting the weirdness that just happened. . Simple theme. All I want to do is like have sex all the time. ROSE: Yeah. ROSE: Yeah, but you weren’t giving me the vibe and I went for it anyway. Acting Annie Baker is like living in an uncomfortable dinner party -- lots of long moments between dialogue where everyone stares at their plate while trying to think of a way to say what’s on their mind. The Flick. The new owner discovers “dinner money” and threatens to fire Avery, who doesn’t rat on his new friends, but asks them to stand up for him and admit their own guilt. They decided to put in an old movie after hours on the projector the weekend that Sam is out of town, and as they sat in the empty theatre, Rose gave the unresponsive Avery a non-unexpected-but-still-surprising handjob until his lack of response pulled her back. In this monologue (or, sort of monologue… I’ve once again spliced the shit out of a scene to make into a reasonable piece), Rose is talking to Avery after that “malfunctional fling” I described in the summary. Annie Baker Monologue. Like eight, nine times a day. ROSE: I can’t stay attracted to anyone longer than four months. The owner of the theatre sells it to a new owner who’s going to replace the film projector with a digital one. Sam is a 35-year old theatre usher with very little upward potential. As Dinner money. It’s weird. Sam is a 35-year old theatre usher with very little upward potential. The play is about three people who work in a movie theatre in Massachusettes, one of those old, tacky-colored, one-screen deals that’s kind of faded out with the advent of multiplex movie theatre monopolies like Regal and AMC and Cinemark and the necessity for 3D technology.